CEOL
Croatia

Local Press Digest

ZAGREB, Apr 28, 2000 (Rtr)


VECERNJI LIST

State oil monopoly Ina says price of petrol might decrease by 3-4 percent in May.

Talks on two-way refugee returns between Bosnia and Croatia to start by June 10.

Speculation rife as to who could replace central bank governor Marko Skreb, who has returned his mandate to parliament. Top candidates include Skreb's deputy Zdravko Rogic and several younger central bank officials.

Farmers threaten to block roads on May 15 unless their demand for higher price of milk is met.

Survey ahead of local election in Zagreb: Social Democrats get 24 seats and Social Liberals 11 in the 50-seat city council.

Austrian newspaper publisher Styria is still interested in taking over Vecernji List despite current investigation into its sell-off, says Austrian ambassador Rudolf Bogner.

JUTARNJI LIST

The publication of taped conversations from President Stipe Mesic's office has undermined course of investigation, says Interior Minister Sime Lucin.

Mesic's team of computer experts proposes that an Adriatic island be given to Bill Gates for period of 30 years.

Croatia has moved from authoritarian regime into a democratic chaos, in which it is most important to return all refugees and protect their property, says UN human rights reporter Jiri Dienstbier.

VJESNIK

Commentary: Few political parties have extended support to central bank governor Marko Skreb and unambiguous message sent by parliament was that he was expected to resign.

Three small regional banks - Bjelovarska, Cakovecka and Trgovacka - set to merge into a bank with assets of 2.5 billion kuna, which will be owned by Erste and Steiermarkische bank.

NOVI LIST

Pensioners angry by implications of a World Bank recommendation that government should not pay back overdue pensions, totaling around 30 billion kuna, from budget.

SLOBODNA DALMACIJA

Workers of tobacco factory TDZ prepare rallies to protest what they say is government's failure to facilitate investment of British American Tobacco in the factory through maintaining discriminatory tobacco laws.



Original article